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Sabia

Sabia

Darnall, Sheffield

I was upon intensive care, with a patient who had come in. And before they were going to ventilate this patient, he asked to see me. So I went, and it was by his bedside. And he said to me, I’m just really, really scared. What if I never wake up from this? And I didn’t want to dismiss how he was feeling. So I said to him, it’s okay to be scared. Is there anything that you’d like me to do? And he said, can you say some prayers with me? So I said, some prayers. Unfortunately, two to three weeks later, treatment wasn’t working, so we had a discussion with the family, and they decided that they were going to withdraw. And I remember being on the ward, to say some prayers with this patient who’s ventilated, and was told that they can have one family member come in to see him. So I went to speak to the family of five that were there. And I’d say to them, that you need to pick who’s the one person that can come, and I felt awful. It was really sad, because they were such a lovely family. And they said, look, we will do whatever you say. And they decided that only the mum was going to go in and see this patient.

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